Travelling In Myanmar – Important Things You Need To Know

By Mary Charie / 07/11/2016

Travelling In Myanmar – Important Things You Need To Know

Must See in Myanmar

Bagan, Myanmar

Travelling In Myanmar – Important Things You Need To Know

When I was travelling in Myanmar, which was in February 2016. I didn’t find it easy to get information about their tourism or even just general information. Most of the articles online are too old to call reliable, whilst I am not a fan of printed travel guides.

I eventually gave up, instead, I decided to learn about Myanmar through wondering around to this next destination I was about to explore. Even I spent quite a reasonable amount of money, able to meet great locals and get used to how the Burmese get by in their everyday life or the fact that tourism is still young, I still wished I knew more things about Myanmar before I arrived.

RELATED POST: Need a visa to Myanmar? Here’s a Complete Guide

 

TRAVEL COST IN MYANMAR

*All prices are in US Dollars

Most travellers who have been travelling in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand before entering Myanmar would say that it’s a little bit more expensive compared to its neighbouring country. I totally agree with that, although you can definitely make your trip as affordable as you want.

Accommodation: 10-12$  for a single bedroom. Dorm rooms are not widely used yet and the quality of accommodation in Myanmar is a lot less compared to other South-east Asian destinations. If you are travelling with someone, that should save you some pennies.

Food: 1-3$  per meal by the local eateries whilst the meal to a restaurant is around 5-7$

Tourist Fee: 10-25$  (3-7 day validity). Tourist fee is required to huge attractions in the country. Such as Shwedagon Pagoda, Bagan, and Mandalay Hill.

Bottled Water: .50$

Beer: 1.5-2$

Transportation: 12-16$  for an overnight bus (7-9 hours)

Simcard: 10-12$ for a sim card with mobile data – MPT has one of the best internet coverage in Myanmar

RELATED POST: Hitchhiking is also an option. Here’s my Hitchhiker’s Guide to Myanmar

 

Must See in Myanmar

Sule Pagoda, Yangon

SOLO TRAVELLING OR WITH SOMEONE?

To travel solo or not? One of the greatest question for travellers coming to Myanmar. Although was travelling in Myanmar with a friend, travelling solo is definitely safe and possible. However, if you travel with someone, you will be able to save more money on accommodation as you can share a private room. Another note is, I noticed that I didn’t meet a lot of travellers throughout my stay in Myanmar, thus, travelling alone might get a little bit boring once in a while. Travelling in Myanmar solo is great if you like being alone and exploring by yourself.

RELATED POST: 3 Weeks In Myanmar

FOOD IN MYANMAR

The food in Myanmar is not as attractive as the other South-east Asian countries in my own opinion. However, the good thing is, the local food here is very diverse just like its locals. You can easily find Indian, Chinese, and Thai food around. Myanmar, especially Yangon is also popular for street food. Roam on the long strip of 10th street in Yangon, where the locals head to for a feast dinner.

 

Must See in Myanmar

Local Market in Mandalay

DRESS CODE

Myanmar is a very Buddhist and conservative country. Covering up when visiting Pagodas and Temples are definitely a must. It’s advisable to dress up modestly even when walking on the street to show respect to the locals, or else expect to receive stares if you walk wearing shorts and tank tops both for men and women.

If you love getting on the scene of local life, Burmese wears longyi which you can buy almost everywhere. On February to May is the hottest and driest month in Myanmar, make sure you pack lightweight trousers and shirts.

RELIGION IN MYANMAR

Burmese are popular for being highly believers of Buddhism. There are heaps of temples and pagodas throughout the country. Most Burmese even the young people are considered religious. The culture of Burmese is mostly integrated with their religion, which in my opinion, the reason why the locals are really friendly and warm.

There are a lot of monasteries and monks spread out the country, you will see many monks walking around together collecting alms. You are free to give food donation.  The 50% of the monk population is living in Mandalay.

hitchhiker's guide to myanmar

The amazing Burmese <3

FREE ACCOMMODATION

I’ve done and heard other travellers sleeping in the monasteries, I have done it myself with a friend. It’s definitely free and possible, as long as you know where to go and have your sleeping bags ready, you should be fine. However, perhaps you will feel safer if you are travelling with someone. Myanmar, in general, is safe, as long you as travel with your common sense and you trust your guts, your trip should be fine.

POLITICAL ISSUES

It is not a secret that Myanmar still has a civil war in their country, they won their first Democracy in November 2015.Because of the civil war, there are some areas that foreigners are not allowed and not advised to enter.

Coming out from their previous government, Burmese still find it hard to talk about the political matters or say something against the government. I suggest you not to ask any local/driver to take you to some places where foreigners are not permitted to go. If you are highly curious to understand the bureaucratic issues they are facing, make sure to ask politely.

RELATED POST: Here are the Places You Should Not Miss when visiting Myanmar

 

 

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About the author

Mary Charie

She's the person behind this blog. Torn between her itchy feet and writing, Mary found herself soaking up in the world of travel blogging. She travels on her own terms and tries to build her own world whilst pushing herself into every corner of life, breaking limit beyond her capabilities.

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